History Leaves of the Methodist Tree – February 2017

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree
Compiled by Johnny Cordell

Did you Know?

That in gathering data for his work “Winning of the West” Theodore Roosevelt, traveling through the Holston country, wrote: “In 1783   Methodism, destined to become the leading creed of the west, first gained a foothold along the Holston, with a congregation of 72 members.  After Methodism cut loose from British connections in 1785, the time of great advance began.  The circuit riders were speedily eating bear meat and buffalo tongue on the frontier.  Wherever there were a group of cabins, thither some Methodist circuit rider made his way.  The fiery zeal of the Methodist made them leaders.”

 

Did you Know?

That on a more humorous note Methodist preachers two hundred years ago were big eaters, as they are today??  The Reverend Jesse Lee in his journal in 1800, gave the following report:  “After we finished our business in Conference, four of the largest preachers amongst us went to a friend’s store and were weighed.  My weight was 259 lbs.;  Seely Bunn’s 252, Thomas Lucas’s 245; and Thomas F. Sergeant’s 220; in all 976 lbs. and and all of us travel on horseback.”

 

Did you Know?

That seldom do churches achieve unique fame, but State Line Church did in May of 1937 when Ripley’s Review listed this church in their column, “Believe It or Not”. The church was built part in Alabama and part in Georgia which is in the Holston Conference.  The original State Line Church was built in 1890 as a church and school house.  In 1933, it was deeded to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and even though it was originally given as a community church, the M.E Church, South was the only denomination to serve the church continuously for forty-nine years.  State Line Church (Sulphur Springs, GA) appeared in Ripley’s review, May 1937, “Believe It or Not”.  In that article it was stated   that the ministers were all Methodist while the Sunday School Superintendent was a Presbyterian and all the Sunday School teachers were Baptist.  As the church sat across the State Line, the minister stood in the pulpit in Georgia and the congregation sat in Alabama.  Another interesting tidbit is that E.R Lewis, one of the ordained ministers produced by Chapel Hill, was the minister of State Line Church from 1921 to 1925.  Also W.L. Tate, who followed E.R. Lewis, was married to Lillie Johnson, a member of Chapel Hill Church.  Ministerial support from the conference ended in 1947. 

 

Did you Know?

For several years a non-denominational Sunday School   was held in the Center Point School Building, which is adjacent on the north side of the Chapel Hill UMC Family Life Center, currently owned by David and Fern Lockhart.  Church services were held at Chapel Hill Church at a later hour on Sunday morning.  However, due to an official ruling that the school could no longer be used, the non-denominational Sunday School was without a place to meet.  Chapel Hill Church proposed to add a Sunday School Wing if this group agreed to attend.  So, in 1951, this non-denominational group agreed to attend with the understanding that the Sunday School would continue to be non-denominational.  This understanding has been adhered to and is still in effect.  The Chapel Hill Sunday School maintains its own financial account of which Mark Allen is currently the Treasurer and Chairman.  We appreciate his service in this area.

 

Sources: Holston Historic Heritage Vol 5   November 2, 2005

“Chapel Hill” Edna Susong Jackson

Next article will be excerpts from the original journal of a Methodist “Circuit Rider” within the Holston Conference 1867-68.

Question:  Since 1852 how many counties has Henniger/Chapel Hill Church been located within, and what are the names of these counties?  Answer is in next month’s article.

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree – January 2017

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree

Compiled by Johnny Cordell

 

The United Methodist Church, with at least 12 million members as of 2014, is the largest denomination within the wider Methodist movement of approximately 80 million people across the world.  In the United States,

UMC ranks as the largest Protestant Church, after the Southern Baptist Convention, and third largest Christian denomination.  In 2014, its worldwide membership was distributed as follows:  7.2 million in the United States, and 4.4 million in Africa, Asia, and Europe.  Yet, this Christian denomination only began in the mid-eighteenth century in Britain, due in large part to the strong leadership, extensive traveling,  and organizational abilities of John Wesley, celebrated today as the most prominent “Founder of Methodism”.  While studying at Oxford, Wesley, his brother Charles, and several other students formed a group devoted to studying, prayer, and helping the underprivileged.  They were labeled “Methodist” by their fellow students because of the way they used “rule” and “method” to go about their religious affairs.  Wesley and his brother Charles brought the movement to the colony of Georgia, arriving in 1735 as the Church of England missionaries to the American Indians.  After two years, they returned to England,  believing for the most part, that they had been a failure.  In 1738, Charles experienced Pentecost, and three days later, John had his Aldersgate Street conversion in which his “heart was strangely warmed”.  With the established church closed to his ministry, John Wesley took to the fields, preaching to coal miners, and commoners.  Despite recurring opposition, his itinerant evangelism soon expanded throughout the British Isles.  It is estimated that he rode over 250,000 miles on horseback and preached 40,000 sermons.  His use of lay preachers and small “societies” spread the movement to some 120,000 followers by the time of his death in 1791.  Today many Methodist denominations still embrace notable elements of the Wesleyan ministry:  an emphasis upon preaching; the organization of small groups for prayer and bible study; the importance of tract distribution; and concern for the poor, oppressed, and disenfranchised.  The Wesleyan theology also has an ongoing influence outside of strictly Methodist denominations.  The role of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer and the church has affected the holiness movement, the Pentecostal movement, and even the recent charismatic movement.  The concern of both John and Charles Wesley was an educated clergy and knowledgeable laity, leading to many Wesleyan colleges, and seminaries.  The balance between the life of the mind and the life of the spirit is still critical to the Wesleyan tradition, which seeks to preach the gospel to whosoever, convert the sinner, and raise up the saint.

The U.S. Methodist Episcopal Church was organized in 1784. The denomination grew rapidly and was known for its “circuit rider” ministers on the advancing frontier. A split occurred over slavery but the church reunited in 1939.  In 1968 the merger of the Methodist and Evangelical United Brethren Churches created the United Methodist Church.  The United Methodist Church does not have a central headquarters or a single executive leader but is governed by the General Conference, the Council of Bishops, and the Judicial Council.  The General Conference, the primary legislative body of the UMC, is the only body that speaks officially for the Church.  Meeting once every four years to determine legislation affecting connectional matters, it is composed of no fewer than 600 and no more 1,000 delegates split evenly between laity and clergy.  Every UMC congregation is interconnected throughout the denomination via a unique, interlocking chain of conferences.  The United Methodist Church practices representative democracy in its governance. Conferences elect delegates who are authorized to act and vote.  Within the United States, the United Methodist Churches are divided into 56 conferences. Each conference is headed by a Bishop.  Chapel Hill is a member of the Holston Conference which is located in the mountains and valleys of East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and Northern Georgia.  The Holston Conference is named after the Holston River which in turn was named after a German settler family of Holstein.  The conference is home to over 900 congregations with the membership of approximately 164,500.  The conference is divided into 12 districts as follows:  Abington, Big Stone, Chattanooga, Cleveland, Johnson City, Kingsport, Knoxville, Maryville, Morristown, Oak Ridge, Tazewell,   and Wytheville.  Chapel Hill is a member of the Chattanooga District. At the local church level, such as Chapel Hill, The Book of Discipline requires each church to have a Charge Conference, Church Council,  Committee on Staff (Pastor) Parrish Relations, Board of Trustees, Committee on Finance, and Committee on Nominations.  Also the local church may have as many additional committees as required to fulfill the work of the church.

Basically, United Methodists trust free inquiry in matters of Christian doctrine. Faith is guided by scripture, tradition, experience and reason.  Of paramount importance, however, is scripture as the witness of God’s creating, redeeming, and sustaining the relationship with God’s people.  United Methodists have an obligation to bear a faithful Christian witness to Jesus Christ, the living reality at the center of the Church’s life and witness.  To fulfill this obligation, we reflect critically on our biblical and theological inheritance striving to express faithfully the witness we make in our own time.  All persons are welcome to attend Chapel Hill United Methodist Church, receive Holy Communion, and are eligible to be baptized and become members.

 

Sources: Dr. Roger J. Green “Building Church Leaders” Methodist Heritage
Mary Fairchild   “Methodist Church History”
The United Methodist Church
UMC – Wikipedia

Next article will reflect on historical and sometimes humorous tidbits of Methodism

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                 

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree – December

HISTORY LEAVES OF THE METHODIST TREE
Compiled by Johnny Cordell

During the Civil War, the congregation of Henniger’s Chapel (Historic Chapel Hill), like the community as a whole, was evenly split on their sympathies regarding support of the Union and Confederacy.  In 1861, William Stewart of Henniger’s Chapel was appointed a captain of a company of Confederate volunteers from the community, many of whom were members of the church. In later years, after the war, William’s son, the Rev. John R. Stewart, recounts one of his experiences in his book, The Story of My Life when he was a small boy in the summer of 1863.

“This was the year when the Federal troops invaded Sequatchie Valley; it was in August.  Being nine years of age then, I have a vivid ineffaceable memories of those awful times  The first “Yankee” I saw was on my grandfather’s farm (present home of Mr. & Mrs. Jim Taylor Stewart, see footnote 1) where several men were harvesting wheat.  Anderson Stewart, about my age, was there also.  The men were standing in a group around a large walnut tree when four or five “Blue Coats” rode up.  Anderson and I made a dash for safety, thinking that perhaps the soldiers would use their guns on some or all present.  After we saw that the soldiers were talking in a friendly way with the men, we ventured back that we might get a close-up of these “terrible men” about whom we had heard so much.  Although I saw them under many trying circumstances afterwards, that was the last time I was afraid of the “Blue Coats.”

“In a very short while after this  a squad of soldiers came to our home (present farm of Sam Rogers, see footnote 2).  They came through a large gate at the barn and dashed up to the yard fence and the orchard adjacent to the yard.  Peaches were ripe and a lot of shoats (young hogs) were in the orchard eaten the fallen fruit and were fat and fine but were not large.  The soldiers helped themselves to them, liberally, shot down several; and one thing that we were certain not to forget, a soldier ran his bayonet through the neck of a small shoat and put his gun on his shoulder and walked off with the small porker kicking and squalling as he went.”

“The Federal soldiers were raiding our farm and after they had gone, we were unable to find two yearlings steers; one of which my father had given me and the other I had bought from Mr. Siah Rogers with the money I had made going to mill for neighbors whose horses were gone.  We had saved old Pats, while she was fat and good looking, she had more age on her than the soldiers liked.  I was not so fortunate as to my yearlings.  They had gone with the Yankees and I was dead broke.”

“I was sent to Uncle Jim Stewart’s store (present home of Mr. & Mrs. Sam Kelly, see footnote 3) for something, and when I was ready to start back home, Uncle Jim said, “John you had better go back through the field by your Uncle Joe Lamb; the Yankees are likely to take your mare from you.”  I acted on his suggestion and before I got to Uncle Joe’s (present home of Mr. & Mrs. Cue Wilson – see footnote 4), I met two Yankee soldiers armed.  They stopped me and ordered me down.  I sat still and argued with them.  One of them got me by the bare leg and started to push me off.  Just then the one holding the reign let go and I clapped by heels against old Pat’s sides and she sprang away from them in a dead run.  They cocked their guns but I went on and left them.  Uncle Jim said when I told him about it, “It’s a thousand wonders they didn’t shoot you.”

The author, The Reverend John R. Stewart, was one of six ordained ministers produced by Henniger Chapel/Chapel Hill Methodist Church.

Footnotes

  1. Currently home of Keith Pickett
  2. Currently owned by Mike Lamb
  3. Currently owned by Billy & Donnie Johnson
  4. Currently owned by Sue White Manning

Sources “Chapel Hill” Edna Susong Jackson

Next article will focus on a brief history of Methodism and current organizational structure

Activities


February 2017
Church Activities
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
   

 

 

1

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church

6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

2 3

4

9 am
Chapel Hill Painters in historical chapel basement

5 pm
Rook Tournament

5

6

 

7

 

8

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church

6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

9 10

11

6 pm
High School Youth
After glo at the Condra’s

12

3-5 pm
SPR training session at Sulphur Springs UMC

4 pm
2017 Administrative Board Meeting

13

6 pm
Sisters in Christ

14

12 pm
Senior adult
Valentine’s Day Lunch at Cookie Jar Cafe

6 pm
Sequatchie County Jail Service

15

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church

6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

16

 

17

18

 

19

 7 am
UMM Breakfast

11:30 am
Mardi Gras lunch

20 21

22

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church

6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

23 24

25

 

26

27 28

 

     

February Volunteers

February 2017
Volunteer Schedule

Greeters: Acolytes:
Feb. 5: Clint & Sarai Pierce
Feb. 12: Johnny & Sharon Cordell
Feb. 19: Paul & Ethel Powell
Feb. 26:  Suzanne Reid & Kathy Underwood

Feb. 5: Evan Griffith
Feb. 12: Jozlynn Layne
Feb. 19: Isabella Layne
Feb. 26: Mallory Newsome

Ushers: Bible Bearers:
Feb. 5: Aaron Staley, Dwayne Turner, Kathy Underwood & Glenn Barker
Feb. 12:  Tommy Austin, Jeremy Bradford, Ben Hartman & Travis Cordell
Feb. 19: Bill Colvin, Johnny Cordell, Sharon Cordell & Jane Indyk
Feb. 26: Keith Davis, Edward Hickey, Jeff Jones & D. J. Johnson
Feb. 5: Chloe Griffith
Feb. 12: Emma Heard
Feb. 19:  Kate Cordell
Feb. 26: Max Newsome

Offertory Prayer:  Wednesday Night Refreshments:

Feb. 5: Tommy Austin
Feb. 12: Bill Colvin
Feb. 19: Glenn Barker
Feb. 26: Ben Hartman

Feb. 1: Martha Austin & Sydney Davis
Feb. 8: Christie Dennis & Shannon Land
Feb. 15: Debbie Barker & Martha Barker
Feb. 22: Annette Brown & Liz Wilson
Children’s Sermon Children’s Church:

Feb. 5: Sarai Pierce
Feb. 12: Dawn Jones
Feb. 19: Dwayne Turner
Feb. 26: Emma Bradford

Feb. 5: Ken Fulmer & Chandler Morrison
Feb. 12:  Ethel Powell
Feb. 19: Lynna Griffith
Feb. 26: Michelle Camp & Taylor Goodwin
Trimming around Family Life Center:  Kitchen Duty: (Entire month)
Suspended until spring Barbara Houts & Kathy Underwood
Altar Flowers:   

Feb. 5: Tanesia Staley
Feb. 12: Sharon Cordell
Feb. 19: Fran McCain
Feb. 26: Carolyn Willson

 

 

Servant of the Month – January 2017

Servant of the Month heading

What a great way to start the New Year by announcing our Servant of the Month for January 2017 to be none other than Jeremy Bradford.  He does so much in our church I really would not know where to begin to tell you about his faithfulness and all he does.  If it’s broke he fixes it if it needs to be done, he does it.  I think you get the picture!  He attends Ethel’s Sunday school class and is always in worship whenever he is able.  Jeremy, thank you for serving Christ so faithfully and for all you do in the church.  You’re the perfect choice for our Servant of the Month.

‘Well done, good and faithful servant!  You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things.  Come and share your master’s happiness!’                                                                       Matthew 25:23

Jeremy pictured with his wife Christa and their children Emma & Carter

Birthdays – January 2017

Happy Birthday

January 2017
 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
 1

2

Keith Blevins

3

Charlie Barker

4

Mary Ellen Hoge

 

5

Laura Beth Cordell

6

 

7

Michelle Haman

8

Sydnee Lee
Drake Thompson

9

Sarai Pierce

10

Michelle Camp

11

Allison Condra

12

13

Archer Thompson

 

14

15

 

16

17

 

18

Jordan Camp
Katelynn Cheatham
Candi McLester

19

Dusty Mitchell

20

21

 

22

23

 

24 25

26

Greg Barker

27

Chandra Cribbs
Alden Staley

28

Jacob Clemmer

29

Jeremiah Barker
Joseph Turner

30

Jesyca Dennis

31

Greg Lee

 

     
             

Sisters in Christ

 

Sisters in Christ

Sisters in Christ is the Women’s Ministry of Chapel Hill.  Sisters in Christ meet the 2nd Monday of each month at 6 pm.  They are continuing their study of “Audacious”, by Beth Moore.  Please feel free to join this wonderful group of women. Their next meeting is Monday, January 9, 2017. 

Audacious by Beth Moore

Missions

 missions-logo

There is no mission project for January. You will find our plan for 2017 below. We look forward to a busy year and we ask you to be in prayer for how you will become involved in missions this coming year

 

2017 Mission Plan for Chapel Hill

 February           Ark Singers
March                  South Sudan
April                      The Hands of Christ
May                       Hands on Mission Project
June                      Bishop’s Special Collection
July                       School supplies for Sequatchie County Students
August                Woman’s Care Center (Next Step Resource Ctr.)
September       Samaritans Purse
October             Mission’s Bake/Craft Sale
November        Food Bank
December        Christmas Gifts for Children in Sequatchie County

Other mission news:

  • For our December mission project 23 children in our county received Christmas gifts. Thank you for your generosity in supporting this project.
  • Ark Singers – we sent in $805 for our fourth-quarter donation. Please keep the people of Ukraine and the ark singers in your prayers, especially Anatolij who continues to undergo treatment in Israel for cancer.
  • South Sudan – this country is in extreme turmoil at the present time. Many people have evacuated to Uganda but the schools and churches the Holston Conference helped establish are still functioning as much as they can. Thanks to your donations the orphans have been relocated to Uganda. Please keep the people of South Sudan in your prayers, the situation there is heartbreaking. There is more information about South Sudan on the mission bulletin board.

 

 

We look forward to an exciting year for missions at Chapel Hill in 2017! Thank you in advance for all your help and support in making our program successful.

Chapel Hill Missions Coordinator
Jane Indyk