Category Archives: Son-Shine Newsletter

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree – March 2018

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree
Compiled by Johnny Cordell
Reminiscing of a Chapel Hill Youth

     I do not really remember my first time of attendance at Chapel Hill Church since I was a very small child.  My mother was of the Church of God faith and she did not attend church at Chapel Hill except on special occasions when the children were involved in programs.  She attended Fredonia Church of God when she could, but it was not very often, so my Dad was the one who brought us to church.  My mother was a God fearing individual and always made sure we were dressed and ready for church.  My first Sunday School Teacher was Miss Louise Johnson who taught us the familiar children’s Bible stories.  She was a dear saint of an individual who cared about her students outside of the Sunday School room.  As we became older and more rambunctious, we moved to Ms. Claudia Rogers’ Sunday School class.  Ms. Claudia was an active person, full of life, and not opposed to good natured humor and fun.  She drove a station wagon and always brought a load of kids from Dunlap to church.  Ms. Claudia started a yearly trip to Lake Winnepesaukah for her class, which later morphed until a large transit bus and basically allowing any child in town to participate.  In those days a lot of children had never encountered anything like Lake Winnie.  The rides were a nickel and you could eat a good meal for less than a quarter, so you could have a lot of cheap entertainment for a dollar.  The favorite ride was the “boat chute” which went through a dark tunnel, hooked to a pulley system and hoisted to a high point above the water and released down a steep track to impact onto the lake amid squeals and laughter as one usually got wet.  There was a rumor, that in the past a person had been bitten by a water moccasin snake in the tunnel, so there was no problem with everyone keeping their hands in the boat.  For some of the older boys, it was probably their first life experience opportunity, while in the tunnel, to strategically place their arm around the shoulder of a member of the opposite gender.  I think the trip was an event that everyone looked forward to each year.  I assume Ms. Claudia and possibly other adults in the church paid for the bus, but even a dollar was difficult to obtain as spending money. 

     I remember that during the year I would collect empty coke bottles and redeem them at Wade Swanger’s Store for a penny a piece.  Sometimes I would spend the night with Uncle Frank Cordell and he would pay me a dollar to mow his yard.  I think because I worked for the money, I enjoyed and appreciated the opportunity for a day of jocularity and frivolous fun.  Also, I remember one year, for the March of Dimes, we walked from Dunlap to the Hamilton County line.  You have to realize that in those days, you might encounter two or three cars as we ascended the mountain on Highway 127.  For safety reasons and traffic density, you would not be able to do that today. 

     We have had some excellent Sunday School teachers who have provided outside activities over the years, but Ms. Claudia was my first teacher at that age level, and I appreciated the time, effort, and money that she contributed.  We, the boys, were a handful and personally I do not think I would have tolerated some of our antics and behavior that she had to endure. Ms. Claudia is no longer with us, but I’m sure if there are any raucous rowdy angels in Heaven, she has it well under control. 

Last month’s question:  Volunteers from this community (Sequatchie Valley) served in West Tennessee Units during the War of 1812.  Why were they not assigned to the East Tennessee Units?  In 1812 all territory West of Knoxville was considered the West.  There was no Middle Tennessee geographic region at that time.  Andrew Jackson of Tennessee was considered the first president to be elected from the Western United States.  

Next month’s question:  What year did Chapel Hill Church organize a youth baseball team?

 

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree – October 2017

History Leaves of the Methodist Tree

Compiled by Johnny Cordell

 

Camp Meetings and Circuit Riders: Did you know?

             In most camp meetings, the focal point of the gathering was receiving Communion.  The circuit rider often over saw the preparations of the site for the camp meetings.  A site previously used could be “reclaimed” in a single day, and he would direct volunteers in clearing away fallen branches and making any needed repairs to the plank seats.  Preparing a new site, however, took three or four days.  Many camp meetings lasted six days or even nine days.  Eventually, four days became the fixed number, with meetings beginning on Friday afternoon or evening and continuing until Monday noon.  One saying was “The good people go to camp meetings Friday and backsliders Saturday, rowdies Saturday night, and gentlemen and lady sinners Sunday.”  Many people at the early camp meetings displayed unusual physical manifestations:  fainting, rolling, laughing, running, singing, dancing, and jerking (a spasmodic twitching of the entire body), where they hopped with head, limbs, and trunk shaking “as if they must…..fly asunder.”

          Camp meetings were one of the few opportunities for young people to meet future spouses since everyone they knew in the immediate community were relatives.  At some camp meetings, watchmen carrying long white sticks patrolled the meeting grounds each evening to stop any inappropriate conduct.  Enemies of camp meetings sneered that “more souls were begot than saved.”  After several days of courting at the camp meetings, many couples were married after the meeting concluded, or soon thereafter.

Experience taught circuit riders that “Christians enjoy those meetings most which cost them the greatest sacrifice.”  A fifty-mile journey was “a pretty sure pledge of a profitable meeting.”  An observer describing the preaching of James Mc Gready, an early leader of camp meetings, said “He would so describe Heaven, that you would almost see its glories…he would also describe hell and its horrors before the wicked, that they would tremble and quake, imaging a lake of fire and brimstone yearning to overwhelm them.”  Defending camp meetings, James B. Finley said, “Much may be  said  about camp meetings, but, take them all in  all, for practical exhibition of religion, for unbounded hospitality to strangers, for unfeigned and fervent spirituality, give me a country camp meeting against the world.”

           Methodist Francis Asbury (1745-1816) became one of the best know circuit riders in America.  Letters addressed “Bishop Asbury, United States of America were promptly delivered.  Plagued by illness all of his life, he continued to visit circuits even when he had to be tied to the saddle to remain upright.”  The early American Methodists asked four questions:

  1. Is this man truly converted?
  2. Does he know and keep our rules?
  3. Can he preach acceptably?
  4. Has he a horse?

          Methodist circuit riders were also book distributors.  Their commission on sales provided some of them the only cash they ever saw.  This helped spread Bibles, hymnbooks, and other religious material throughout the frontier.  Peter Cartwright, long time circuit rider, was twice elected to the Illinois legislature.  His one defeat was in a congressional race when he lost to a lanky opponent by the name of Abraham Lincoln. Beef or venison jerky was the circuit riders staple food because it would not spoil easily.  Riding a circuit was demanding on those who undertook this grueling ministry – half died before reaching age 33.  Yet many ministers thrived on the rigors of the circuit.

          Peter Cartwright likely held the record for endurance:  he enjoyed 71 years as an itinerant.  A circuit rider was to take good care of his horse.  The First Discipline of the Methodist Church said “Be merciful to your Beast.  Not only ride moderately, but see with your own eyes that your horse is rubbed and fed.”  When Francis Asbury came to the colonies in 1771, there were only 600 American Methodists.  When he died 45 years later, there were 200,000 American Methodists, largely because of camp meetings and circuit riders.

Source:  Timothy K. Beougher “Christianity Today, Issue #45”

Last month’s question:  What Methodist Civil War General helped to establish a well-known college within the Holston Conference following the War?   College was named after a U.S President located in East Tennessee.  Answer: Major General Oliver Otis Howard, who was known as the “Christian General.”  He lost an arm in battle in 1862, yet he continued to command and lead troops until the end of the war.  Helped to establish Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee.  Compiler’s Note:  If you ever occasion to be in the vicinity of LMU, I would recommend to visit the Lincoln Museum located on campus which houses memorabilia and history of the Lincoln Era.

Next month’s question? What are the two oldest Methodist Churches in the Sequatchie Valley?

 

 

Activities – July 2018

 

July 2018
Church Activities
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

6th Sunday after Pentecost               1

10 am
Pastor Jared Wood’s 1st Sunday
6 pm
Community July 4th Worship Service at Chapel Hill UMC
Ice Cream Social following service

 

2

 

3

12 pm
Chapel Hill Lunch Bunch at El Metate

Independence Day    4

Church offices closed and Wednesday Night Activities canceled in observance of July 4th

5

6 7

7th  Sunday after Pentecost         8  


4 pm
Administrative Board Meeting

9

6 pm
Sisters in Christ

10

 

 

11

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

 

12

5:30 pm
Leadership Team Meeting
(Salad supper prior to meeting)

 

13

 

14

9 am
Chapel Hill  Painters
9:30 am
H.S. Youth rafting trip on Ocoee River

 

8th Sunday after Pentecost         15
                        

 

7 am
UMM Breakfast

16

 

17

 

 

18

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church
6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

19

20

21

Deadline for August newsletter article submission

9th Sunday after Pentecost           22
                  
          

 

 

23

24

25

5 pm
Bell Practice
6 pm
Guitar/Strings Practice
at historical Church
6 pm
Bible Study & Youth Programs

move-in day for Pastor Wood and family

26

27 28

10th Sunday after Pentecost      29  

Holston Home 5th Sunday Offering

    

 

30

 

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Volunteers – July 2018

July 2018
Volunteer Schedule

Altar Flowers: Greeters:

July 1: Lula Bess Hickey
July 8: Suzanne Reid
July 15: Tanesia Staley
July 22: Annette Brown
July 29: Anne Ellis

July 1: Donna Knox & Betty Legg
July 8: Paul & Ethel Powell
July 15: Doug & Suzanne Reid
July 22: Aaron & Tanesia Staley
July 29: Dwayne Turner & Laurelee Wyatt

Acolytes: Bible Bearers:

July 1: Rayburn Layne
July 8: Jozlynn Layne
July 15: Isabella Layne
July 22: Connor Staley
July 29: Jozlynn Layne

July 1: Connor Staley
July 8: Emma Heard
July 15: Kate Cordell
July 22: Rayburn Layne
July 29: Emma Heard
Offertory Prayer:  Ushers:
July 1: Bill Colvin
July 8: Jeff Jones
July 15: Jeff Land
July 22: Ethel Powell
July 29: Paul Powell
July 1: Michael Griffith, Evan Griffith, Edward Hickey & Jeff Land
July 8: D.J. Johnson, Linda Johnson, Bill Legg & Clint Pierce
July 15: Paul Powell, Aaron Staley, Dwayne Turner & Kathy Underwood
July 22: Tommy Austin, Jeremy Bradford, Bill Colvin & Jane Indyk
July 29: Johnny Cordell, Sharon Cordell, Travis Cordell & Keith Davis
Children’s Sermon Children’s Church:

July 1: Jeremy Bradford
July 8: Christa Bradford
July 15: Emma Bradford
July 22: Annette Brown
July 29: Sarai Pierce

July 1: Ethel Powell
July 8: Lynna Griffith
July 15: Michelle Camp & Taylor Goodwin
July 22: Chandra Cribbs
July 29: Stacey Blevins & Sydney Davis

Nursery: (Sunday School/Worship)
Wednesday Night Refreshments:
July 1: Michelle Haman/Judy Hartman
July 8: Kathy Underwood/Ethel Powell
July 15:Sue Manley/Stacey Blevins
July 22: Emma Bradford/Lisa Holland
July 29: Michelle Haman/Judy Hartman
July 4: No Wednesday Night Activities – July 4th holiday
July 11: Kristy Albright & Shannon Land
July 18: Debbie Barker & Martha Barker
July 25: Annette Brown & Liz Wilson

Trimming around Family Life Center: 
(Any time during the week beginning)
Kitchen Duty: (entire month)

July 2: Michael & Evan Griffith
July 9: Aaron Staley
July 16: Alan G. Barker
July 23: Gaither Barker
July 30: Douglas Reid

Dawn Jones

**Please be mindful that we have some youth with severe nut allergies, please do NOT send anything with any type of nuts

Wednesday Night Refreshment Volunteers: If you need someone to serve your refreshments, please contact Ethel Powell

If you are unable to serve on the date  you are scheduled, please trade your week with someone else.  If you would like to get a list of others, please fee free to contact Becky at the church office Monday – 8 am to 12 noon

 

Servant of the Month – July 2018

Servant of the Month heading

We have chosen as our Servant of the Month for July, Jeremy Bradford.  Jeremy has worked countless hours on the church parsonage over the past several months getting it ready for Pastor Jared and his family to move into.  He has gone above and beyond the call of duty to ensure all was done by June 20.  Thank you, Jeremy for all your hard work and expertise to renovate the parsonage in order to make it a wonderful home for our new pastor and his family.  Jeremy also gives outstanding Children’s Sermons, you never know what to expect during his delivery of the Children’s Sermon.  Your church family thanks you for all your time and effort into everything you do in and around Chapel Hill.

 ‘Well done, good and faithful servant!  You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things.  Come and share your master’s happiness!’                                                                       Matthew 25:23

 

Jeremy (on left) is found once again serving his church family

 

Wedding Anniversaries – July 2018

  Happy Anniversary

July 2018
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

2

 

3

 

4 5 6

7

8

9

 

10

 

11

12

Tim & Angela Willis

 

13 14
15

16

 

17

18 19

20

Bobby & Chandra Cribbs

 

21

22

Porter & Natalie Condra

23

24

25

Jeremy & Christa Bradford

 

26

 

27

Tommy & Martha Austin
Johnny & Sharon Cordell

28

Edward & Lula Bess Hickey

29

John & Chrisi Barker

 

30

 

 

31

 

 

   

 

Birthdays – July 2018

Happy Birthday

July 2018
 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

2

Koda Hendon

3

4

 

5

6

 

7

 

8

 

9

Miriam Gibson

10

Brody Mitchell
Pamela Ryle

 

11

12

 

13

14

 

15

 

16

 

17

Kate Cordell
Kate Sanders
George Tholken

 

18

Michael Dennis

 

19

 

20

Natalie Condra
Suzanne Reid

 

21

Sue Manley

22

 

23

Amber Golovlev

 

24

Spencer Blevins

25

26 27 28

29

 

30

Jane Indyk

31

Dwayne Turner